Share The Love Campaign–Three-Day Eye-Dancers Giveaway

There is no question that independent publishing is taking the world, and particularly the e-world, by storm these days.  With each passing week, it seems, the publishing world continues to evolve, and more and more indie books, especially e-books, become available.  The Eye-Dancers joined that list a couple of months ago, and it’s been a true pleasure interacting with fellow bloggers and indie authors.

One of those authors, M.S. Fowle, is hosting The Share The Love Campaign this weekend.  It’s a wonderful idea.  Today, tomorrow, and Sunday, Mel is featuring several indie books on her site (The Eye-Dancers among them) as part of this campaign, including her own book The Sire.  I strongly encourage everyone to click on the link and check out The Share The Love Campaign, and to browse around Mel’s great site.

As part of the campaign, many of the authors involved are issuing a giveaway for their featured book, and The Eye-Dancers is no exception.  So . . . for three days–today, tomorrow, and Sunday (February 15–17), The Eye-Dancers is available for free.  If you’d like to read it, free (there’s that word again!), please just send me an email at michaelf424@gmail.com and let me know which file format you’d prefer.  And there’s no limit to the number of giveaways.  However many people contact me, that’s how many free copies will go out this weekend. . . .

As I’m sure has been apparent in this blog, I am a big fan of vintage things–old comic books, TV shows, movies. . . .  And it’s hard not to see something of a parallel between the indie and e-book publishing boom of today and the television boom of the 1950s.  Back then, TV was the sparkling new home entertainment platform.  It could have gone in any direction–it  represented a grand and exciting opportunity for writers, directors, producers, and actors.  And in those early years, it attracted top-notch talent.

Many of the writers for television back then were playwrights.  Since most TV programs in the early and mid-1950s were live, they were, in effect, televised plays.  The audience watching at home was viewing the actors in real time.  Not filmed or pre-recorded.  If an actor forgot or butchered a line, the gaff was instantly seen by millions.

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Some of the live shows were anthologies–featuring dramatic plays each week.  Playhouse 90, The Philco Television Playhouse, and Kraft Television Theatre were among the most notable, and master wordsmiths such as Reginald Rose, Paddy Chayefsky, Gore Vidal, and Rod Serling (in his pre-Twilight Zone days) contributed first-rate scripts.  It was an exciting time, opening up new vistas of creativity and opportunity.

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Movie theaters were concerned.  As early as 1952, the theaters adopted wide-screen and 3-D processes, utilizing technology television couldn’t match in those days, hoping to entice people to return to the movies.  With the rise in TV’s popularity, movie audiences shrank.  The established industry (the Silver Screen) took note of the newcomer television, and though it may have thumbed its nose at the upstart, it respected the threat and acknowledged the competition.

It is much the same today.  The established publishing world has had no choice but to respect and take seriously the rise of the e-book and of the indie author.  And promotions such as The Share The Love Campaign further the indie cause even more.

Once again, I would like to thank M.S. Fowle for hosting this great event.  She and all of the indie authors like her are this generation’s equivalent to Rod Serling, Reginald Rose, and other playwrights from television’s Golden Age.  Perhaps one day, years from now, they will call the second decade of the twenty-first century a Golden Age in publishing, when the tide of the industry changed irrevocably.

And if indie authors unite and continue to take part in programs like The Share The Love Campaign, then, surely, that change will have been for the better.

Thanks so much for reading!

–Mike

Brave New World

At one point in The Eye-Dancers, while marooned in the variant town of Colbyville, Mitchell Brant, Joe Marma, Ryan Swinton. and Marc Kuslanski talk to a girl and her brother.  During the conversation, Joe pulls out his cell phone, even though he already knows it won’t work.  There is no cell phone network in Colbyville.

Intrigued by the device, having never before seen one, the girl asks him what it is and what it does.  This is when Mitchell, ever the storyteller, intervenes.  He says that Marc, the science wiz, is in the process of inventing something called the cell phone.  Marc throws Mitchell a “why are you getting me into this” look, but ultimately he plays along, explaining the concepts of cellular technology to the girl and her brother.

Certainly the tremendous proliferation of e-books and Nooks and Kindles is not merely the rambling bluster of a seventh-grade know-it-all.  (No offense, Marc!)  This is a very real phenomenon.  And it’s been around for a few years now.  Even two years ago, a headline in the Daily Mail exclaimed, “Is it the end for the paperback?”  With apologies to Aldous Huxley, it is a brave new world.

One of the remarkable features of e-books is–they can be read on nearly anything.  Of course, e-readers like the Nook and Kindle are ubiquitous these days . . .

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. . . but the fact is, you do not need an e-reader to read e-books.

One thing I have learned since publishing The Eye-Dancers is that there is still a misconception among many people that, if you don’t own a Kindle or a Nook, you can’t read an e-book.  I’ve run into this with family, friends, and just in general.  A lot of people aren’t aware of the Nook App and Kindle App.  These programs allow you to download the Apps onto your smartphone, tablet, PC, iPad, or pretty much any device you have.  And, best of all, they’re free.  That’s always a good thing.

So, if you have yet to join the e-book revolution because you don’t own an electronic reader, there is no need to wait any longer.  Simply download the free Nook App or Kindle App onto whatever device is most convenient for you, and you’ll be ready to purchase as many e-books as you want.

It’s an exciting time for independent authors around the world.  Even just a decade ago, there were not many avenues available for effective distribution of self-published books.  But today, the old cliche is literally true–the sky is the limit.

It is indeed a brave new world.

Thanks for reading!

–Mike

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